A Cognitive Approach to Understanding Poverty

Class Details

  • Class Type: Online
  • Date: 3/5/2018 - 4/8/2018
  • Adams State Credit: 1
  • Nonmember Price: $145
  • CEA Member Price: $45
  • Graduate credit for this class is optional and costs an additional $55.

  • Currently Enrolled: 23 of 27
  • Class Type: Online
  • Date: 7/8/2018 - 7/29/2018
  • Adams State Credit: 1
  • Nonmember Price: $145
  • CEA Member Price: $45
  • Graduate credit for this class is optional and costs an additional $55. This class is a book study and requires students to purchase a book.

  • Currently Enrolled: 20 of 20
  • Class Type: Online
  • Date: 8/20/2018 - 9/9/2018
  • Adams State Credit: 1
  • Nonmember Price: $145
  • CEA Member Price: $45
  • Graduate credit for this class is optional and costs an additional $55. This class is a book study and requires students to purchase a book.

  • Currently Enrolled: 5 of 30
  • Class Type: Online
  • Date: 2/11/2019 - 3/3/2019
  • Adams State Credit: 1
  • Nonmember Price: $145
  • CEA Member Price: $45
  • Graduate credit is available at $55.00 per credit. Required Text: A Framework for Understanding Poverty; A Cognitive Approach by Ruby Payne

  • Currently Enrolled: 10 of 20

About the Course

This course will provide participants with an opportunity to explore how poverty affects behavior and academic performance in students. Participants will be engaged in ensuring a positive school environment that embodies respect and inclusivity. Participants will discuss the mindset of change and how accountability strengthens the SHARE model. Participants will collaboratively create a school-wide resource of strategies to encourage students to participate emotionally, cognitively, and behaviorally.

Required Text:

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Recognize how having a framework of poverty can help better understand students living in poverty and what can be done to ensure success.
  • Identify the ‘hidden rules’ of school and access what children living in poverty need to know in order to be successful at school.
  • Implement a school-wide plan for engaged learning where relationships are reaffirmed and emotional, cognitive, and behavioral participation at school is encouraged.
  • Develop a school environment where a child’s risk factors do not impair his or her success, including enrichment activities for students.
  • Grade(s): Pre-K Kindergarten 1st Grade 2nd Grade 3rd Grade 4th Grade 5th Grade 6th Grade 7th Grade 8th Grade 9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade Elementary K-5 Secondary 6-12
  • Subject(s): Education Support Professionals Professional Development Specialized Service Providers

Facilitator

Amy Bohen


Reviews

Tracy Starr
I love this class and the ideas presented. It offers you a different perspective and a way to look at leveling the playing field for our students of a variety of economic levels.
Lynda Micikas
The topic of the class is important and very worth learning about. I thought the book was interesting and also quite valuable to read. The discussion prompts were, generally, quite good at promoting reflection. By way of suggestions, I would have liked to see: 1) more participation in discussion by the facilitator. I would think that the goal of discussion is not just for the students to swap ideas, but also for the students' thinking to be challenged and probed and expanded by the thoughtful involvement of an expert in the subject. I would have enjoyed -- and benefited from -- that. kind of expert involvement 2) more thoughtful journal assignments/prompts. Asking professionals to outline the major ideas of a chapter seems a bit juvenile. I guess it's fine if you really think that we won't read the chapters otherwise. But perhaps you could increase the value and challenge of the assignment by requiring some discernment and justification...e.g., phrasing it something like this: "Please choose six ideas from Chapters xx - xx that you think are crucial to an educator's understanding of students (and/or adults) from poverty. For each idea, explain 1) why you think it is crucial, and 2) how understanding it will impact your teaching in the future. Be specific." That kind of assignment achieves the goal of making sure that the student read the book, but ALSO, because it would require some comparative thinking and defending would be much more thought-provoking and valuable to complete. All-in-all, though, I am glad to have taken the class. Very helpful!Thanks!

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